Cases

Qui Tam Whistleblower

Qui tam whistleblowers play a vital role in preventing fraud against the government. By filing a suit on behalf of the government for fraud against it, any private individual may potentially share in a significant percentage of the recovered funds.

What is a Qui Tam Whistleblower?

“Qui tam” refers to private citizens who reveal acts of fraud against the government and sue on the government’s behalf, and it is the basic premise of the False Claims Act (FCA). If an entity makes a false claim that results in a loss to the government (U.S. and certain state governments) either directly or indirectly, a private citizen—often referred to as a “relator”—can sue that entity on the government’s behalf in an effort to recover compensatory damages, civil penalties and triple damages. Additionally, the FCA allows the relator to share in as much as 30 percent of the total recovered and protects the relator from employer retaliation. In fact, if the relator is retaliated against, he or she may also be awarded “all relief necessary to make the employee whole,” including back pay, multiples of back pay, litigation costs and reinstatement.

As of 2014, healthcare fraud comprised the bulk of qui tam cases. Other examples of qui tam cases include:

  • Falsely inflating the cost of goods, services or contract pricing data in government contracts
  • Providing inferior products to government entities and falsely certifying them as meeting specifications
  • Billing the government for services or equipment that were never ordered, or billing for new equipment when old equipment was used
  • Marketing pharmaceuticals for purposes other than those approved by the FDA

Qui Tam Whistleblower Attorney

For additional information regarding qui tam whistleblower programs and protections, or to discuss a potential claim, contact Motley Rice qui tam whistleblower attorneys Bill Norton or Mary Schiavo by email or at 1.800.768.4026 for a free, confidential initial consultation.